THE BIG JAGUAR Saloons

THE BIG JAGUAR Saloons
Mk VII, Mk VIII, Mk IX, Mk X, 420G

Update: Wednesday, 2008-01-02 - 15:14
Model Guide

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The BIG JAGS - Model Guide

Notice:
With the model designations you will find roman and arabic numerals.



[Chassis-series Mk7 to Mk9]
[Monocoque-series Mk10 to 420G]
[Why no JAGUAR Mk VI]
[JAGUAR 420G <Distinguishing> JAGUAR 420]





Two big Jaguar-Saloon series

This BIG JAGS - model guide is mainly concerning with the "exterior" (visible from outside) distictive features of the 2 very different Jaguar Big Saloon series of the 50th and 60th.
The "internal" hidden technical differences are adequate discribed in the JAGUAR specialist literature (e.g: JAGUAR Mark VII to 420G THE COMPLETE COMPANION).

The backside of the book "Jaguar Mk VII . VIII . IX . X . 420G Gold Portfolio" (see literature) is showing exactly what the center themes of this website are:


Series Mark 7 to 9:
Picture of a Jaguar Mark VII



Series Mark 10 to 420G:
Picture of a Jaguar 420G

  Jaguar MkVII - 420G Gold Portfolio
Picture: Backpage of Jaguar MkVII - 420G Gold Portfolio


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The Chassis Series Mk VII to Mk IX (1950 to 1961)

The Mark VII (to IX) -chassis series based on the Jaguar Mark V saloon, which was not much distinguishing from the last SS -Jaguar prewar model (later named Mark IV) and therefore she still had a separate chassis below her body. Her impressive appearance was often compared with Bentley, but in literature she was discribed as more sporty.

JAGUAR Mk VII (October 1950 to September 1954)
 Two-parts windscreen
 Complete covered backwheels (spats)
 Air flaps on both sides behind front wheels
 Parted lamp glasses
 Small backlights
 Radiator grille with small frame and combined SS-Jaguar-badge
 Old fashioned signal arm indicators
 Built-in additional lamps below headlights
 Drum brakes
 Unicolour laquering

JAGUAR Mk VIIM (October 1954 to July 1957)
 Two-parts windscreen
 Complete covered backwheels (spats)
 Lamp glases not parted
 Small backlights
 Blinkers instead of signal arm indicators
 Round horn grills instead of built-in lamps
 Additional lamps on top of bumper
 Drum brakes
 Unicolour laquering

JAGUAR Mk VIII (October 1956 to December 1959)
 Undevided windscreen
 Cut-away spats (backwheel covers)
 Curved chrome trim on both sides
 Small backlights
 Radiator grille with stronger frame and Jaguar badge
 Round horn grills
 Additional lamps on top of bumper
 Drum brakes
 Two-tone colour on demand

JAGUAR Mk IX (October 1958 to September 1961)
 Undevided windscreen
 Cut-away spats
 Curved chrome trim on both sides
 Bigger chrome backlights (only late models)
 Round horn grills
 Additional lamps on top of bumper
 Discs brakes
 Two-tone colour on demand

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Why no JAGUAR Mk VI ?
After Mark V (1948-1951) Jaguar skipped the following number. As reason was assumed that at the introduction of the Mark VII Jaguar there was already a Bentley Mark VI on the market. And as the Jaguar Mark VII was undoubtably showing a resemblance to this Bentley, further was assumed, that Jaguar tried to avoid confusion by choosing a different mark number.
Jaguar Mk 7 Bentley Mk 6
Jaguar Mk 7 Bentley MK 6

The Poor Man's Bentley
The Jaguar Drivers' Club Switzerland has a special comment on the Jaguar–Bentley relation on its German download, soon after its market introduction the public created an appropriate nickname for the (Jaguar) Mark VII, which pointed on its good price-performance ratio and its outside resemblance to the prestigeous Bentley brand:
"The Poor Man's Bentley"

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The Monocoque Series Mark X to 420G (1961 to 1970)

The Monocoque-series was a completely new design with one of Jaguars first self-supporting carriages. Compared with its predesessor the new body was shaped essentially more flat, stretched and elegant.

JAGUAR Mk X 3.8 (October 1961 to August 1964)
 No chrome trim on the sides
 Raditor grille not devided
 Dashboard top without upholstery

JAGUAR Mk X 4.2 (October 1964 to December 1966)
 Outside distinguishing to 3.8 Mark X only by type designation on rear bonnet

JAGUAR 420G (October 1966 to June 1970)
 body (carriage) exactly like Mark X
 chrome trim on the sides with integrated small blinker signals
 radiator grille with strong vertikal middle bar
 dashboard with upholstery on top and integrated central watch
 two-tone colour on demand

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Distinguishing between Jaguar 420 and Jaguar 420G
In Automobile magazines, Jaguar magazines and even in special Jaguar books you may find a mixing up of the Jaguar 420 and the Jaguar 420G. But they are really very different models. The outside distinguishing can be successfully done only by a quick view, but one should have a sense for body dimensions and body proportions.

Picture showing smaller Jaguar 420 in front and bigger Jaguar 420G in the back


Jaguar 420G ('66 to '71): The "Big Gee"
The JAGUAR 420G als the direct JAGUAR Mk X successor had the original big Mark X body and distinguished (except of details not visible from outside) only by a badge with a new name on the boot. Noting the stroke volume, the badge was added by a "G" for "grand" or "great" for distinguishing to the smaller 420 Jaguar, and the nickname was "Big Gee" (see "Patten parties to Goodwood").

Jaguar 420 ('66 to '68): The "Fourtwenty"
The JAGUAR 420 was made by fixing a new nose to a modified S-Type Jaguar, which based on the much smaller Mark II Sports –Saloon body. This is why the difference in body size should be recognize even from a greater distance.

Lyons-Original and Leyland-Copy
In a direct comparison you will be able to distinguish between the Lyons-Original and the Leyland-Copy. Caused by the larger dimensions, the sideview- lines and -proportions of the JAGUAR 420G look more stretched as those of the JAGUAR 420. The 420G showing the creation of a genius – a completely rounded piece of work - nobody did it better than Sir William Lyons. The 420 as a Mk II conversion which was enlarged on front-end and back-end, had to live with stylistic compromises, but was as well a beauty for its lovers as any other Jaguar. Especially her front view, which anticipated the following JAGUAR XJ series 1, was very beautiful. As the "Fourtwenty" was respectably powered by her engine, with her lighter body and her compact dimensions she was without any doubt the more sporty of both JAGUARs.



JAGUAR 420 vs JAGUAR 420G (Distinctive features)

  420 showing B-column
  420 with regtangular horn grilles (like XJ series 1)
  420 with sidely fuel filler flaps
  420 with front bonnet (similar to Mk II)
  420 without chrome trim on the sides
  420 without picnic tables in the backside of the front seats

  420G no visible B-column
  420G with round horn grilles (like Mark IX)
  420G with fuel filler flaps on boot top
  420G with flapping front end (similar to XKE)
  420G with chrome trim on the sides
  420G with picnic tables in the backside of the front seats


Picture showing 420 with left side fuel filler flap and visible B-column
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